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Aug 262016
 

Healthy eyesThe eye is the lamp of the body. So, if your eye is healthy, your whole body will be full of light, but if your eye is bad, your whole body will be full of darkness. If then the light in you is darkness, how great is the darkness! (Matthew 6:22-23)

Today’s verses, on the surface, don’t seem to fit into the context of this part of Jesus’ message. He has just been talking about storing up treasures in heaven rather than on earth and the next bit will be about not serving God and money. So why should he suddenly start talking about eyes?

I believe this subject of the eye fits in well with the flow of His message. Let me explain.

Jesus is not talking here about physical eyes but spiritual eyes. In the natural, when our eyes are closed we obviously can’t see and when we open them, in the daylight, light floods in and we can see what’s around us and what’s happening. In the spiritual when we have the light of illumination (God’s word) we can see or perceive much more clearly. A famous verse that follows this idea is:

Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path. (Psalm 119:105)

I have heard people using the phrase to people “Do you see what I mean?” quite a lot. We are asking if they understand or comprehend what you are saying. Seeing something or ‘getting it’ is good. If it were bad, it would mean that they don’t get what we are saying and we might need to explain some more.

An example of this idea can be found in Matthew 20 where Jesus is telling the parable of the generous landowner who pays his workers the same wage whether they started first thing in the morning or only ‘clocked on’ late in the afternoon. Verse 15 is translated “Am I not allowed to do what I choose with what belongs to me? Or do you begrudge my generosity?’ (Matthew 20:15) The last part has a footnote in most bibles, because the exact translation is “Or is your eye bad because I am good?

This explains what Jesus is saying; A bad eye is an eye that doesn’t see grace or goodness or generosity properly. This fits well in the context of money and where our heart is regarding it. A bad eye can look at money in a greedy way and all the opportunities it can use for itself. A good eye will look at the same money and consider how it can be used to bless others or invest into the building of God’s kingdom. It could be the same pile of money but the attitudes about how it should be used would be totally different.

So we can see that Jesus’ argument is following a logical pattern. We are not to lay up for ourselves treasures on earth where we are only thinking about ourselves, but rather looking to eternity, having the view that our money is to be used as a blessing. When we do that, we have healthy eyes and we will not be serving money but God. More on that subject next week.

 August 26, 2016  Posted by at 12:00 pm The sermon on the mount No Responses »
Aug 192016
 

Treasure in heavenDo not lay up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy and where thieves break in and steal,but lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust destroys and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. (Matthew 6:19-21)

Gerald Ratner was the chief executive of a British Jewellery company which was worth millions. With a few careless words about his product, the stock price of his company lost £500 million overnight. His earthly treasure was gone. Chris and Denise were living the life of luxury. They owned a thriving property development business worth £35 million. They had a mansion, cars, horses, expensive holidays, everything that most of us can only dream of. When the bank where all their money was held went into receivership, all their money was gone. They now live in a flat and receive the basic Jobseekers allowance. Their earthly treasure is gone!

Money is a huge God in this society and we can easily get lured by its promise of comfort and security. It causes us to dream about all the things we can buy, the holidays we can go on and the comfort we can enjoy. But we all know, in theory anyway, that money doesn’t buy us happiness.

In this passage Jesus is directing us to where our focus should be, because we can get very easily distracted.

I don’t believe that Jesus is saying we shouldn’t ever have savings, or plan for the future, but He is challenging us to look at and consider where our trust is focussed.

The key word of this passage is ‘treasure’ or in other words the things that motivate or control us. The treasures of this world are mostly materialistic, the ‘things’ we set our gaze on. They are temporal and actually quite empty. They are the Christmas presents lusted after for months that after sometimes only a few days are left gathering dust in the corner of the cupboard. They promise much, but in the end are empty. Have you ever saved up or waited for something to discover that it never quite promised the happiness it was meant to bring.

We are not meant for this world, we are just passing through. Why are we so keen to put down roots that we know won’t last? It is so easy to be taken in by this world’s allure. We live here and work here and get caught up in the moment, but that moment passes oh so fast.

Our treasure is and should be in heaven. It’s not material but spiritual. It’s an eternity spent with our father in peace, wholeness and security. It’s true joy. The wonderful gift that God has given us and the very reason we are on this earth is so that we can work towards that time. Everything we do now can have an impact into eternity. I’m pretty sure he wasn’t talking about what I am now, but I love the quote from Maximus in the film ‘Gladiator’ when he said “What we do in life, echoes in eternity” so true.

Our treasure in heaven is shown when we: build the church, when we feed the poor, when we do good works, when we tell people about Jesus, when we forgive, turn the other cheek, when we seek peace and when we love and serve like Jesus did.

Let me challenge you this week to find ways to pay into your heavenly bank account and as you focus on these treasures, the world’s grip will get a little looser.

 August 19, 2016  Posted by at 12:00 pm The sermon on the mount No Responses »
Aug 122016
 

FastingAnd when you fast, do not look gloomy like the hypocrites, for they disfigure their faces that their fasting may be seen by others. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you fast, anoint your head and wash your face, that your fasting may not be seen by others but by your Father who is in secret. And your Father who sees in secret will reward you. (Matthew 6:16-18)

We come this week to a subject that really doesn’t make sense to the natural mind. Why would anyone want to ‘not eat’? Surely God has provided food for us to enjoy and satisfy our hunger, not to punish our bodies?

In our minds we can probably imagine religious fanatics following a strict ascetic lifestyle. These people can have rather unhealthy masochistic tendencies. Definitely not normal.

It’s certainly true that fasting is not commanded in the bible, but in these verses today, Jesus undoubtedly makes the assumption that we will fast. Twice He says “When you fast”

It’s important firstly to see what fasting is not.

It is surely not ‘hunger striking.’ We are not trying to twist God’s arm. We are not fasting to feel pain and it’s not an extension of health dieting either.

So why do we fast?

Actually, fasting is not suppressing our desire for something but rather our intense pursuit of something else. Let me explain. We are placing our desire for God above our desire for food, we are saying our spiritual hunger is greater than our physical hunger. In Matthew 9, John’s disciples question Jesus as to why His disciples were not fasting. Jesus responded:

And Jesus said to them, “Can the wedding guests mourn as long as the bridegroom is with them? The days will come when the bridegroom is taken away from them, and then they will fast. (Matthew 9:15)

Fasting has a strong link to sadness and mourning, it suggests something that is longed for. Jesus’ disciples didn’t need to feel sad while He was with them, but as soon as He left them and until His second coming there is a longing for His return amongst all His followers. You can hear the longing in Revelation 22:20 He who testifies to these things says, “Surely I am coming soon.” Amen. Come, Lord Jesus!

There is a fascinating link between fasting and the Lord’s supper. With the Lord’s supper we are eating and drinking to remember the past. With fasting we are not eating to look forward to the future.

Let’s look at a few more examples from the bible about fasting;

(1) Fasting was done by God’s people after they had displeased Him

So they gathered at Mizpah and drew water and poured it out before the Lord and fasted on that day and said there, “We have sinned against the Lord.” And Samuel judged the people of Israel at Mizpah. (1 Samuel 7:6) See also; Joel 2:12, Jonah 3:5-8, Judges 20:26

(2) Fasting was done to prepare hearts and seek God’s help in preparation for battle

Blow the trumpet in Zion; consecrate a fast; call a solemn assembly; (Joel 2:15)

See also 2 Chronicles 20:1-4

(3) Fasting was a sign of sincere and humble repentance from sin

Then I turned my face to the Lord God, seeking him by prayer and pleas for mercy with fasting and sackcloth and ashes. (Daniel 9:3)

See also Nehemiah 9:1-2 and Joel 2:12-13

(4) Fasting teaches us self-control and sometimes reveals what controls us

More than any other spiritual discipline, fasting reveals the things that control us. Things like; anger, bitterness, jealousy and fear will all rise to the surface as soon as we start fasting.

Our belly is not to be our God. Describing the enemies of God, The apostle Paul says;

Their end is destruction, their god is their belly, and they glory in their shame, with minds set on earthly things. (Philippians 3:19)

See also Romans 16:18. Paul also talked about Self-discipline when he explained his attitude in 1 Corinthians 9:25-27

Every athlete exercises self-control in all things. They do it to receive a perishable wreath, but we an imperishable. So I do not run aimlessly; I do not box as one beating the air. But I discipline my body and keep it under control, lest after preaching to others I myself should be disqualified. (1 Corinthians 9:25-27)

(5) Fasting is a powerful weapon in spiritual warfare

Fasting is humbling and reveals our complete dependence upon God and forces us to draw on him and his power, and to believe fully in his strength. This is what Jesus did when He fasted for 40 days and nights at the beginning of His ministry (See Matthew 4:1-11)

When Jesus heals a boy with an unclean spirit in Mark 9:14-29 Jesus says at the end “This kind cannot be driven out by anything but prayer” (Mark 9:29) Many manuscripts have “and fasting” at the end.

(6) Fasting helps us to discern God’s voice

Fasting helps us tune into the Holy Spirit’s leading and guiding and we are able to discern His will much more easily. In Acts 13:2-3 it mentions fasting in preparation and then the commissioning of Barnabus and Saul.

While they were worshipping the Lord and fasting, the Holy Spirit said, “Set apart for me Barnabas and Saul for the work to which I have called them.” Then after fasting and praying they laid their hands on them and sent them off.

These are just a few aspects of the huge subject of fasting. If you’re spiritual life is a bit static and you find yourself not getting breakthrough in certain areas, why not try fasting?

The beauty in the context of Jesus’ teaching on the ‘sermon on the mount’ is that this spiritual discipline is done in secret. It’s just between us and God. We do it to please Him and Him alone and what a promise goes with it – He will reward us!

 August 12, 2016  Posted by at 12:00 pm The sermon on the mount 1 Response »
Aug 052016
 

deliver us from evilAnd lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. (Matthew 6:13)

Last week we looked at the phrase “Lead us not into temptation” which is the negative part of this verse. This week we will look at the positive part “but deliver us from evil” The phrase could equally be translated “deliver us from the evil one” but it pretty much amounts to the same thing.

I think that we can all agree that evil is real. You only have to turn on the television to watch the news or open up a newspaper to see a constant stream of evil happening every single day. The bible is clear that this evil has a source and he has numerous names, the two most common being ‘the devil’ or ‘Satan.’ The bible also makes it clear that this evil one wants to destroy humanity. Describing him as a ‘thief’ in John 10:10 it describes what he wants to do;

The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy.

He is our enemy and he is very powerful and adept at what he does because he has been wreaking havoc from the very beginning.

That’s the bad news. The good news is that Jesus has defeated him through his death and resurrection. Even though he is a defeated foe, make no mistake he can still cause havoc, but Jesus wants to continue to help us overcome him on a daily basis. There is an aspect of this prayer that we need to not be passive in defeating evil, but we pray this part of the prayer to show that we need God’s help. We cannot do it on our own. We are, in humility, asking for His gracious assistance and support.

If you have an enemy and you know he wants to attack you, it’s important to know how he is going to do it. That’s why reading and knowing your bible is very important.

Let’s look at a couple of ways he tries to attack us:

(1) Deception

And the great dragon was thrown down, that ancient serpent, who is called the devil and Satan, the deceiver of the whole world—he was thrown down to the earth, and his angels were thrown down with him. (Revelation 12:9)

He will try to deceive you in every way possible, mainly through lies. Lies are his native language;

He was a murderer from the beginning, and has nothing to do with the truth, because there is no truth in him. When he lies, he speaks out of his own character, for he is a liar and the father of lies. (John 8:44)

(2) Accusation

As part of the lying process, he will tell you untruths about yourself constantly and try to make you feel worthless.

And I heard a loud voice in heaven, saying, “Now the salvation and the power and the kingdom of our God and the authority of his Christ have come, for the accuser of our brothers has been thrown down, who accuses them day and night before our God. (Revelation 12:10)

(3) Temptation

He will try to expose your weak spots. We all have them. It could be sexual, anger, gluttony, gossip. Basically anything that would cause us to sin. He even tried to tempt Jesus after He had been fasting in the wilderness for 40 days and 40 nights and at His weakest point. (See Matthew 4:1-11)

In this account of Jesus’ temptation, He gives us the best answer to counteracting these onslaughts from the devil – God’s word.

If you notice, each time Jesus was tempted, he replied “It is written” and proceeded to quote scripture. Yes of course God will deliver us from evil, but He has placed the tools in our hands to help ourselves. The word of God is so precious and powerful, that studying and reading it on a daily basis will really help us overcome evil and fight every accusation the devil throws in our direction.

What are you doing to get the word of God inside you?

If you want to read the bible every day and not get pushed around by the Devil’s lies and deceit, why not visit my other blog www.readbibledaily.info

There are two bible reading plans; one has a short reading with some useful notes and a prayer and the other goes through the bible in a year. These readings are ‘rolling’ so you don’t have to wait till 1stJanuary to start.

I haven’t had time to mention the other weapons we have to fight the evil one such as the armour of God as mentioned in Ephesians 6, but I wrote a series of blogs on this subject some while ago. If you want to read further click on the following links:

http://adrianpursglove.com/the-armour-of-god/

http://adrianpursglove.com/the-belt-of-truth/

http://adrianpursglove.com/the-breastplate-of-righteousness/

http://adrianpursglove.com/peaceful-shoes/

http://adrianpursglove.com/the-shield-of-faith/

http://adrianpursglove.com/the-helmet-of-salvation/

http://adrianpursglove.com/the-sword-of-the-spirit/

 August 5, 2016  Posted by at 12:00 pm Prayer, The sermon on the mount No Responses »
Jul 292016
 

temptationAnd lead us not into temptation (Matthew 6:13)

We are approaching the end of ‘The Lord’s prayer’ within my ‘sermon on the mount’ series. Last week we looked at the huge issue of forgiveness and forgiving others just as we have been forgiven.

Verse 13 is split up into two phrases which go ‘hand in hand’. This week I am going to look at the negative aspect “And lead us not into temptation” and next week the positive statement of “but deliver us from evil.”

Today’s phrase on the surface could give us cause for concern. Surely God is not tempting us? After all it says in James 1:13 Let no one say when he is tempted, “I am being tempted by God”, for God cannot be tempted with evil, and he himself tempts no one.

We understand the word ‘temptation’ today in purely negative ways, however at the time of Jesus it did not just mean to cause to sin. The meaning had the idea of being tried and tested or put under trial. It is clear from the bible that God did allow certain trials to come people’s way to see if they would prove true. A classic example is Abraham who was prepared to sacrifice His son Isaac. When Abraham passed the test, God said “Do not lay your hand on the boy or do anything to him, for now I know that you fear God, seeing you have not withheld your son, your only son, from me.” (Genesis 22:12)

Joseph too, in Genesis 39, was severely tempted when Potiphar’s wife kept pressing him to sleep with her. He passed the test even though it meant being in prison for at least another 2 years. Through this trial, God had seen his character and rewarded Him in due time.

And what about Jesus? He was tempted in the wilderness after fasting for 40 days, as recorded in Matthew 4. This was of course not the only time Jesus was tempted. Even in the garden of Gethsemane before His crucifixion He was in torment and asked the father if there was another way possible. But He stood firm. The bible makes it clear that Jesus went through every temptation that we go through, He did not receive special privileges;

For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin. (Hebrews 4:15)

I believe this prayer about God not leading us into temptation, means we are asking not to be tempted prematurely or unnecessarily. We are asking God to restrain us from heading into trials and temptations of our own making. We want His help rather than coping on our own. Praying this prayer earnestly, reveals your utter dependence on God and a realisation of your own weakness and a determination to do what’s right. You will do all in your power, as far as it depends on you, to avoid temptation. You are following the example of Matthew 26:41 Watch and pray that you may not enter into temptation. The spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak. Notice that the first thing to do is ‘watch’, you need to be mindful of what temptations you are vulnerable to. The phrase “Don’t play with fire” springs to mind. Find out what the fire is and then don’t play with it!

After we have done all we can to avoid temptation, sometimes God still allows them to get through, but take heart that He will not let you be tempted beyond what you can bear.

No temptation has overtaken you that is not common to man. God is faithful, and he will not let you be tempted beyond your ability, but with the temptation he will also provide the way of escape, that you may be able to endure it. (1 Corinthians 10:13)

Next week we will look at what it means to be delivered from evil.

 July 29, 2016  Posted by at 12:00 pm Prayer, Temptation, The sermon on the mount No Responses »
Jul 222016
 

Forgivenessand forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors……For if you forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you,but if you do not forgive others their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses. (Matthew 6:12, 14-15)

Today we arrive at a key point of the ‘Lord’s prayer’. I don’t think I am overstating it, but this subject is crucial if you want to be a true follower of Jesus. It’s such an important subject that straight after Jesus taught His disciples about prayer, He reiterates the point again in verses 14 and 15 to accentuate the importance of this subject.

I know I’m generally going through the ‘sermon on the mount’ verse by verse, but rather than cover the same subject in two weeks’ time, I thought I would do it all today.

Forgiveness is a key aspect of Christianity, because anyone who is a follower of Christ has asked for and received forgiveness. If anyone just follows Christ because they think they are already a good person, they have missed the point. Before we come to Christ, we are all sinners and a long way from God. In fact the bible refers to us as ‘dead’ in our sins (Ephesians 2:1, Colossians 2:13 etc). We cannot reach God through our own efforts. We come to an acknowledgment of our sinful state before a Holy God and receive the forgiveness Jesus offers that is available through His death and resurrection.

The important point of our verses today is that when we have received forgiveness we should in turn forgive others. God has given us the example to follow. It just isn’t right to receive God’s forgiveness and not extend forgiveness to others. Jesus makes this point in the parable of the unforgiving servant in Matthew 18:21-35. In fact the consequences of not forgiving somebody are quite shocking.

God knows that forgiveness is one of the hardest things for us to do. It is not just a ‘one-off’ process either. We have to forgive some people over and over again. We do it continuously, because every now and again the same old hurt and resentments come back to us. That’s why we should repeat this prayer, if not daily, then very regularly.

This subject is so important because we are all part of God’s family. As a parent I hate it when my kids fall out and fight, God is just the same. He loves it when His children get on with each other and forgive one another. In fact the bible says that when it happens He has reserved a big blessing for us:

Behold, how good and pleasant it is when brothers dwell in unity!….. For there the Lord has commanded the blessing, life for evermore. (Psalm 133:1,3)

There is generally a lot of misunderstanding regarding forgiveness. Forgiveness is not necessarily restoring a relationship to its previous state before things went wrong. Sometimes when trust has been broken it can take a long time to win back. It’s not becoming a ‘door mat’ either so that someone sins against you multiple times and you are stuck just having to forgive them without them facing up to the consequences of their sins. Sin needs to be confronted and not tolerated.

I will finish with just a few more points about forgiveness:

  • Forgiveness is a process. People can be very hurtful and especially those closest to us. Some emotional problems can take a long time to heal. Start with the intention to forgive and then let God help you achieve it.
  • We forgive if they repent or not. Some people can hurt us and they seem to be quite happy to do so. Remember this; Forgiveness is about our attitude, not their action.
  • We don’t always have to tell them. Some people can be blissfully unaware that they have hurt us. Telling them we have forgiven them can be a bit of manipulation to make them feel guilty. It can also be a form of pride. Some people need to be confronted though, so make sure you are confronting with the right attitude.
  • Forgiveness does not mean forgetting. It’s normal for memories to be triggered in the future. When we get these memories, it’s what we do with them that counts. Many times we have to forgive over and over again. It should get better the more you do though!
 July 22, 2016  Posted by at 12:00 pm forgiveness, Prayer, The sermon on the mount No Responses »
Jul 152016
 

DAILYBREADGive us this day our daily bread (Matthew 6:11)

This next part of ‘The Lord’s prayer’ may come as a bit of a surprise. We have been praying about the glorious themes of God’s kingdom and His will and rather than continuing on to other ‘spiritual’ things we instead focus on a rather mundane subject of daily bread. But the placement of this ‘mundane’ subject at this point reveals a lot about the care and compassion of God.

I’m going to take this simple sentence bit by bit and reveal to you what it shows about our wonderful God.

Firstly, notice it says “give us” not “give me.” I have said it many times before, that our culture is all about ‘me, me, me.” We are encouraged to only think about ourselves; “What can I get out of it?” “Is it right for me?” God’s kingdom is much more about ‘us’ about God’s church together. God doesn’t mind us praying for our own provisions but He loves it when we look out for our brothers and sisters and consider their needs too.

The next thing to notice is we are requesting our bread for “this day.” We are not asking for bread for the week or for the month. We only need enough for this day. Looking any further could lead to worry and perhaps a lack of trust. This has echoes in the Old Testament where God gave an amazing provision of daily sustenance called “Manna.” The passage is found in Exodus 16:

Then the Lord said to Moses, “Behold, I am about to rain bread from heaven for you, and the people shall go out and gather a day’s portion every day, that I may test them, whether they will walk in my law or not. (Exodus 16:4)…….And Moses said to them, “Let no one leave any of it over till the morning.” But they did not listen to Moses. Some left part of it till the morning, and it bred worms and stank. (Exodus 16:19-20)

We need to trust God on a daily basis for that day’s provision. Our faith will grow ever stronger as we become reliant on Him and trust Him for each day’s supply.

I am quite convinced that Jesus wasn’t talking about just bread. I believe ‘bread’ here is a metaphor for every kind of provision in our lives. God provides for us in many different ways and in many different areas. Apart from physical food, He also provides emotionally and spiritually, shelter and clothing too, jobs, loved ones and family, even sleep (Psalm 127:2). He provides everything that is essential for the wellbeing of our lives.

And my God will supply every need of yours according to his riches in glory in Christ Jesus. (Philippians 4:19)

In many ways, those of us in the affluent west have many things we need already. Many in the rest of the world wonder where their next meal is coming from. We must never forget or take for granted how blessed we are living where we do. Perhaps the ‘us’ part is God asking us to help others less fortunate than ourselves. Something to think about!

When we ask God to provide for us, we are humbly acknowledging Him as the sole giver of all that we need. We are living day by day, not worrying about tomorrow. We need to come to Him every day in full expectation that He will do all that He has promised and provide for our every need.

 July 15, 2016  Posted by at 12:00 pm Prayer, The sermon on the mount No Responses »
Jul 082016
 

Gods kingdom and willYour kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. (Matthew 6:10)

We are currently going through a mini-series on ‘The lord’s prayer’ within a very long running exploration of the most famous sermon of all time, ‘The sermon on the mount.’

Last week we explored the privilege of being able to call God ‘father’ and how, when we pray, that we should desire that His name would be; honoured, revered and adored. We discovered that it is not just a prayer to be repeated over and over, but each part is like a heading we can use to expand our prayers.

Today we are going to look at two more headings: God’s kingdom and His will.

Have you got clear in your mind what God’s kingdom is? It can be a little confusing can’t it? There have been many opinions over the years about what His kingdom is. Some would say it is all in the future, when He comes again and makes everything new. Some think it is His church, or social reform, or even that it is a personal conversion experience.

The Kingdom of God is mentioned many times in scripture and so we can get a good understanding by studying these passages together.

The phrase ‘Kingdom of God’ refers to God’s rule and reign. It is clear that there are two kingdoms which are in conflict; ‘Satan’s,’ or the ‘kingdom of this world’ and the kingdom of God.

Jesus came to bring God’s kingdom down to earth, to meet the opposing kingdom head on. He announced on many occasions that the kingdom of God had arrived;

The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand; repent and believe in the gospel.” (Mark 1:15)

Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.” (Matthew 3:2)

And proclaim as you go, saying, ‘The kingdom of heaven is at hand.’ (Matthew 10:7)

There is an aspect too that God’s kingdom is yet to come fully. There are many prophecies in the Old Testament and multiple passages in the New (not least the book of Revelation) which speak about God’s kingdom being established and Jesus sitting on the throne.

So we can say that the Kingdom of God has an aspect of ‘now’ and ‘not yet’. Until the time that Jesus fully establishes His kingdom when He comes again, He has passed the rule of His kingdom here on earth to His ambassadors; those of us who have accepted Him as Lord. We can bring His kingdom in now, through prayer and action. When we pray for healing, when we witness, when we forgive and love and help the poor and many other ways, we are bringing God’s kingdom to earth. This is the essence of this part of the prayer, we are asking for God to establish more and more of his kingdom right here in the enemies kingdom. For the light to push back the darkness.

The second part of the passage today talks about God’s will.

It’s so easy, when we pray, to focus on our own needs and wants. That is the way the world is, always focusing in on itself. When we pray to God it must be different. We need to lay aside our own agendas and pray in line with what God wants.

Jesus was the perfect example of this type of attitude

For I have come down from heaven, not to do my own will but the will of him who sent me. (John 6:38)

Even when He was in complete anguish, His determination was still true. In the garden of Gethsemane when He was sweating blood, He still had the grit to say;

Father, if you are willing, remove this cup from me. Nevertheless, not my will, but yours, be done.” (Luke 22:42)

Knowing God’s will is actually very easy, it is the obeying of it which is hard. God’s will is clear throughout the bible, in the way we are to be and the way we should act. It’s actually as simple as copying Jesus. He has provided The Holy Spirit to equip us and help us accomplish God’s desires.

What you need to remember is that God has a perfect will for your life and He wants to help you to achieve it. We can often think we know best but we don’t. Only God knows the full picture and He wants to keep us on the path of contentment, of love, joy and peace. The closer we follow His will, the more we will achieve those things.

Let’s pray this week that His kingdom and will are first in our lives.

 July 8, 2016  Posted by at 12:00 pm Prayer, The sermon on the mount No Responses »
Jul 012016
 

Our fatherPray then like this: Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name. (Matthew 6:9)

Last week we looked at a number of reasons to pray, mainly because God has invited us to and through Jesus given us an example of how to do it. Jesus prayed a lot and I’m sure His disciples wondered what the secret was. In fact I know they wondered because they asked him outright in the parallel passage to the Lord’s prayer in Luke 1. They asked “Teach us to pray.” I don’t know about you, but prayer doesn’t come naturally to me and I find it to be the hardest discipline to do in the Christian life. That is why, when Jesus responds to our request to teach us, we had better sit up and take notice.

At the outset I want to make clear that Jesus is not just giving an example prayer to repeat. Just say these words and that will do. When it says “pray then like this” it means ‘pray in this manner’ or ‘this is the sort of thing you should pray’. It is not saying ‘repeat these exact words’. I believe Jesus is giving us a template, a group of headings if you like, to help us pray effectively.

The first heading “Our father in heaven, hallowed be your name” is packed with amazing truth and the best way we should start all our prayers. Let me just unpack a few thoughts to help us.

There is no other religion past and present that would presume to call their god “Father”. It is an absolutely extraordinary statement and we have sadly lost the wonder of it through over-familiarity. It is true that the scribes and Pharisee’s would have been aware that God had revealed himself as a father in a couple of places in the Old Testament. Amongst others:-

for I am a father to Israel, and Ephraim is my firstborn. (Jeremiah 31:9)

When Israel was a child, I loved him, and out of Egypt I called my son. (Hosea 11:1)

But now, O LORD, You are our Father, We are the clay, and You our potter; and all of us are the work of Your hand. (Isaiah 64:8)

But there is a big difference between having the concept of God being a father figure over a nation and coming to God individually and calling Him ‘Father’.

This concept can be quite difficult for some people. The word ‘father’ can have very negative connotations. Some earthly fathers can be distant, cruel and even violent and can cloud our understanding of what a true father should be. We need to read and meditate on the bible and see how God reveals himself as a loving, kind and forgiving father. A good example of the sort of father that God has revealed himself to be is found in the parable of the prodigal son in Luke 15. The more we meditate on that sort of father, the more we can appreciate what God is truly like. What a comforting thought to start our prayers with, we come to a God who is for us and passionate about us, who loves us and wants the absolute best for us.

It mentions that our father is in heaven, this is not referring to its physical position but focuses on the fact that He is ‘other’ and different from His creation. Heaven is the place of His majesty and glory. He is above us, lofty and transcendent. It’s the place of His rule and control. It distinguishes the one true God from pale imitations. He is in heaven, they are not.

So what does “hallowed be your name mean?”

The word ‘hallow’ means to sanctify or make holy or treat as holy. It is an intense desire that God’s name would be recognised and made known, that it would be set apart and adored, I believe this is a request or a petition and not a declaration. It comes from a heart of worship. The best thing to do when praying is to start with worship. Honouring and revering God starts us off on the right foot. We are not principally coming with a list of wants or concerns and demands. It is not a list of things that are troubling us at the moment that we rattle off. The reason we are worshipping is to give reverence and respect to the one we are approaching.

God’s name is multi-faceted. It means many things in the bible and has many aspects and characteristics. Some examples are:

· The Lord our righteousness (Jeremiah 23:5-6)

· The Lord who heals (Exodus 15:25-26)

· The Lord who provides (Genesis 22:1-14)

· The Lord our shepherd (Psalm 23:1)

· And many, many more.

As you encounter these names in your bible reading, use them in your prayers back to God. If, for instance, you know someone who needs healing, pray that His name would be honoured through their healing.

What a wonderful platform to start a prayer. A declaration that the loving father, who is close and approachable, is also seated above all things in heaven and is in control. That same God has revealed many aspects of His character and can meet all of our needs as we pray to Him.

Next week we will look at what it means when it says “Your kingdom come.”

 July 1, 2016  Posted by at 12:00 pm Prayer, The sermon on the mount No Responses »
Jun 242016
 

WhyPrayDo not be like them, for your Father knows what you need before you ask him. (Matthew 6:8)

Just before we start an in-depth look at the Lord’s prayer, let’s consider why we need to pray in the first place. If our father in heaven knows what we need before we ask Him, why should we bother? After all it is quite clear in the bible that God does know all things;

He determines the number of the stars; he gives to all of them their names. (Psalm 147:4)

O Lord, you have searched me and known me!You know when I sit down and when I rise up; you discern my thoughts from afar.You search out my path and my lying down and are acquainted with all my ways. (Psalm 139:1-3)

(1) Because He has asked us to!

You might even say He has commanded it. Jesus gave a parable encouraging us to pray “And he told them a parable to the effect that they ought always to pray and not lose heart.” (Luke 18:1) It was the parable of the persistent widow.

(2) Because He wills it

It is amazing that the sovereign God, the one who created all things and controls them should want us to pray. It is a mystery, but clear in scripture that He does:

Ask of me, and I will make the nations your heritage, and the ends of the earth your possession. (Psalm 2:8)

Ask, and it will be given to you; seek, and you will find; knock, and it will be opened to you. (Matthew 7:7)

(3) So that we rely on Him

Another mystery that’s difficult to fathom is that God wants a relationship with us. He loves to be consulted and asked and just simply to talk with us. But oftentimes we don’t pray until the situation gets desperate. The story of Jonah is a case in point

Then Jonah prayed to the Lord his God from the belly of the fish,saying,“I called out to the Lord, out of my distress, and he answered me; out of the belly of Sheol I cried, and you heard my voice. (Jonah 2:1-2)

Even when we’ve been completely disobedient, God still wants us to pray

(4) He wants our obedience

Sometimes, we just need to trust that God knows best. If He has asked us to pray, it is for a very good reason and we won’t always know what that reason is! Are you obedient? Here’s a sobering verse:

You do not have, because you do not ask. (James 4:2)

(5) Because prayer changes things

Of course God knows our needs, but like an encouraging parent, he dignifies us and helps us experience the joy of seeing things happen through our prayers. He wants to partner with us and that we should learn and grow through this partnering relationship.

There are many other wonderful aspects of prayer we could look into and I just want to finish with a few more thoughts:

· We pray because we love. We are in a relationship with God and we want to spend time with Him.

· We want to know God more fully. Not just to get things but to know Him One thing have I asked of the Lord, that will I seek after: that I may dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life, to gaze upon the beauty of the Lord and to enquire in his temple. (Psalm 27:4)

· We pray to acknowledge our dependence on God: In him we live and move and have our being (Acts 17:28)

· We pray so that God might receive glory – It’s all about His name and reputation

Finally, we are followers of Jesus and He actually prayed quite a lot!

Next week we will start to look at ‘The Lord’s prayer’ and discover Jesus’ richest teaching on prayer.

 June 24, 2016  Posted by at 12:00 pm Prayer, The sermon on the mount No Responses »